Bennett Park and Fort Washington, New York City

Click to expand photos

Over 240 years ago, this unassuming park in Manhattan was the scene of one of the patriot’s worst defeats during the Revolutionary War.

The Battle of Fort Washington was fought on November 16, 1776 between American forces commanded by Col. Robert Magaw and British and Hessian forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Hugh Percy and Wilhelm von Knyphausen in present-day Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York during the American Revolutionary War. The battle was a complete British victory, with all American defenders killed, wounded, or captured.

In the fall of 1776, American aspirations of independence were at a low point. British General Sir William Howe had overwhelmed and driven the Continental Army commanded by Gen. George Washington out of New York City and Long Island. Washington aspired to escape north to White Plains to avoid being surrounded in Manhattan. He left several thousand men at Fort Washington under Col. Robert Magaw and a brigade commanded by Col. John Glover at Pell’s Point to contest any British landing.

Though Col. Glover delayed the British advance at Pell’s Point on October 18, he was forced to retreat. With General Washington’s defeat at White Plains ten days later, the path was clear for Howe’s army to march on Fort Washington. Col. Robert Magaw stubbornly held on despite Washington’s discretionary order that the fort be abandoned.

Continue reading “Bennett Park and Fort Washington, New York City”

Advertisements

Eveready Diner in Hyde Park, New York

Eveready Diner, at 4184 U.S. Route 9 North (Albany Post Road), in Hyde Park, New York. According to nydiners.com, the Eveready is a 1995 Paramount model, #174. Paramount is a New Jersey company known for pioneering stainless steel exteriors. I love this retro design incorporating populux and doo wop elements.

Diner Resources

Antwerp Ruins

Antwerp Ruins
The Village of Antwerp on the Indian River in Upstate New York has seen better days. Its population has dwindled from a 1920 height of over 1,000 residents. The village main street is now a historic district, but its storefronts are crumbling and abandoned. These brick buildings date to 1889. Antwerp gets its name from the Antwerp company of Belgium, which was part owner in the early 1800s. Despite the dilapidated main street, you can still find beautiful Victorian homes throughout the town.

Swansong of My Heart

Swansong of My Heart
Monument to Lazelle A. Michael (1852-1939) and his wives, Emma J. (1852-1907), Carolyn E. (1870-1915), and Virginia L. (1876-1926), in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. This monument fascinates me, not just because Emma and Virginia were sisters (and clearly the two women depicted in stone), but because I can’t find any information on this family beyond a patent Lazelle filed for an ice cream scoop in 1905. If you know the story behind this monument, please contact me!

The name of Lazelle’s first wife, Emma, is wrapped in grape vines, and the inscription reads:

Abiding faith in immortal hope of glorious reunion.

Crazy Otto’s Empire Diner in Herkimer, New York

Crazy Otto’s Empire Diner, 100 W Albany Street, Herkimer, Herkimer County, New York, was voted Readers’ Choice Best Upstate New York Diner. Crazy Otto’s is a 1952 Mountainview. They serve the “world’s largest omelet,” and the diner’s neon lights look great at night too.

Diner Resources