Milanese Italian Restaurant

Milanese Italian Restaurant
Lovely vintage neon sign for Milanese Italian Restaurant, 115 Main Street in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, just a few blocks from the Hudson River. Santino and Rita Milanese immigrated to the United States in 1956, and they opened their family restaurant in downtown Poughkeepsie in 1971. Their first customer was a lone truck driver who stopped to ask for directions. Today, Alessandro and Aldo Milanese, their sons, run the business and carry on the family tradition.
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Knowlton Brothers

Knowlton Brothers
Old Knowlton Brothers warehouse, 154 Polk Street, Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. George W. Knowlton and Clarke Rice went into the printing business in 1824. Knowlton’s two sons take over and rename the business Knowlton Brothers in 1862. I enjoy nighttime photography because there are no interruptions, or pressure to get a certain shot and move on. Everything is quiet and still.

Long Way Home

Long Way Home
During World War 2, Pine Camp, New York was greatly expanded in order to train the 4th and 5th Armored Divisions and the 45th Infantry Division, but it also housed enemy prisoners as well. A few, like Christian Huppertz, died in captivity. If their families could not be located, they were buried in a small plot next to Sheepfold Cemetery near Great Bend, Jefferson County, New York. Today, Pine Camp is known as Fort Drum and is home to the 10th Mountain Division. The small POW cemetery is well maintained. It contains the graves of six German and one Italian prisoners of war.

When the Weeping Down Beheld Its Mortal Thirst

When the Weeping Down Beheld Its Mortal Thirst
Monument to Henry and Allie Wall-Clark in Calvary Cemetery, on Ridge Road, south of the Black River, in Huntingtonville (Watertown), Jefferson County, New York. I was unable to find any further information about this couple, but their beautifully carved statue of Jesus and Mary speaks for itself.

Lake George Battlefield Park

Visitors to beautiful Lake George, New York can camp and hike on a 264-year-old battlefield and see the ruins of old British and American forts.

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The Battle of Lake George was fought on September 8, 1755 between French forces under the command of Jean Erdman, Baron Dieskau and British forces under the command of Sir William Johnson and their American Indian allies commanded by Chief Hendrick Theyanoguin at the southern tip of Lake George, New York during the French and Indian War. The battle ended in British and Iroquois victory over the French, and the building of Fort William Henry.

In early September 1755, Sir William Johnson marched north from Fort Edward intending to capture the French Fort St. Frédéric at Crown Point on the western shore of Lake Champlain. Around the same time, Baron Dieskau took 222 French regulars, 600 French-Canadian militia, and 700 Mohawk allies and moved south with the aim of destroying Johnson’s base of supplies at Fort Edward. While camped on Lake George’s southern shore, Johnson learned of the French movement and sent 1,000 Colonial militia and 200 Mohawk allies to reinforce the fort.

In what became known as the “Bloody Morning Scout,” Baron Dieskau ambushed the British relief column and inflicted heavy casualties, however, the British and Mohawk warriors were able to inflict equally heavy losses on the French during their fighting retreat back to camp. Both sides lost experienced officers in the engagement. When French forces reached Johnson’s camp, the militia and their Indian allies refused to attack because the British had erected makeshift fortifications.

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Martindale Chief Diner in Craryville, New York

Martindale Chief Diner, at 1000 NY-23 in Craryville, New York, is a 1958 Silk City (#5087), formerly owned by Bert Coons, who operated several diners in that area (three of which had the “chief” theme). It’s unfortunate someone removed the neon lights from this slightly politically incorrect sign.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Fosters Coach House Tavern

Fosters Coach House Tavern
Neon sign for Fosters Coach House Tavern, at 6411 Montgomery Street (U.S. Route 9) in Rhinebeck, New York, along the Hudson River. The tavern opened in 1890 and its first owner was named Walter Decker. Wally Foster called it Foster’s Coach House in the 1940s. In 2016, the Bender family purchased it from Bob and Karen Kirwood, restored it to its original furnishings, menu, and decor, and have been running it ever since. It is a staple of downtown Rhinebeck.