Blog Archives

Gold Medal Flour

Vintage advertisement for Gold Medal Flour on the wall of Colesante’s Tavern at 480 Factory Street in Watertown, New York. The Washburn-Crosby Company became General Mills in 1928. Their original Gold Medal Flour factory was located in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Pickled Pig

The Pickled Pig, at 2639 Main Street (New York State Route 86) in Lake Placid, New York, an artisan pub with a Southern flair, has only been open for a couple years, but I’m loving this sign!

Coca Cola – Relieves Fatigue!

Coca-Cola ghost sign on the side of a brick building at 144 Court Street (U.S. Route 11) in Binghamton, New York. “Delicious and refreshing – Relieves Fatigue” … because it used to contain trace amounts of cocaine. Coca-Cola didn’t become completely cocaine-free until 1929.

5 & 10 Variety Store

Found on James Street in Alexandria Bay, New York

Crystal Restaurant

Former neon sign for Crystal Restaurant at 87 Public Square in Watertown, New York. Opened in 1925, it’s the oldest restaurant in Watertown. Dennis and Jerry Valanos owned the restaurant until 1943, when it was purchased by their head chef, Otto Dephtereos. Today, Peter (Otto’s grandson) and Libby Dephtereos manage the restaurant. A Prohibition-era advertisement for “All Legal Beverages” still appears in the window.

Danny’s Diner in Binghamton, New York

Danny’s Diner, at 151 Main Street in Binghamton, New York, is a classic Sterling model from 1939. According to Roadfood.com, “Danny’s is very popular today, due in large part, we’re sure, to the efforts of owner Pam, whose personality is a perfect complement to Danny’s. Danny and Pam were once married, and when that marriage ended, Danny’s became Pam’s (in ownership, if not in name).”

Vintage Signs of Upstate New York

Lately I’ve been obsessed with old signs–neon signs, ghost signs, populuxe styles, etc. They represent a living memory of the past, and express uniqueness and character from a time when business owners displayed confidence and the promise of permanence.

Nothing lasts forever, of course, especially in the realm of business, but these signs were clearly designed for the long term. Proof is the fact many of these signs have outlasted the businesses themselves. Some, like the Crystal Restaurant in Watertown, New York, beat the odds and have survived for nearly a century.

Autumn at Lake George

Beach Road in Lake George, New York, looking toward Prospect Mountain.