Twi-Lite Motel

Twi-Lite Motel Wisconsin Dells
Glorious vintage neon sign for the Twi-Lite Motel, 111 Wisconsin Dells Pkwy S. (U.S. Route 12), Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin. Wisconsin Dells has been a family vacation destination since the nineteenth century. Many motor inns adopted a “populuxe” style to appeal to travelers on a budget, promising comfortable accommodations at an affordable price.
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Casey’s Diner in Natick, Massachusetts

Casey’s Diner, at 36 South Avenue in Natick, Massachusetts, is a rare 1922 Worcester model. Like many early diner owners, Fred Casey began as a food cart salesman. He purchased this ten-stool diner in 1927 and originally located it on Washington Street. It moved to its current location in 1977. The Casey family has owned this diner for generations. It is possibly the oldest continually operating diner the United States, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Royal Progress at the Maryland Renaissance Festival

The spirit of Tudor England comes alive at the Mid-Atlantic’s most popular Ren fair.

History and magic comes alive outside Annapolis at the Maryland Renaissance Festival, where a huge crowd turned out for Celtic Day last weekend. I was impressed! Jousting and chariot fights were the highlight of the day, but a menagerie of performers kept fair goers entertained throughout the day.

Chariot Race

Welcome to Revel Grove, Oxfordshire, England in the year 1532. King Henry VIII and his mistress Anne Boleyn visit the village as part of their annual summer progress. I didn’t see much of the King and his court, but it’s possible they blended in with the costumed crowd. Visitors were deeply committed to getting into the spirit of the fair.

A Magestic Ride

Rides on a colorfully-painted elephant were one of many amazing experiences for children. The Maryland Renaissance Festival is thoroughly family-friendly, with a huge play area for kids. What a great way to spark children’s imaginations!

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Dan’s Diner in Chatham, New York

Dan’s Diner, at 1005 NY-203 in Chatham, New York, is a 1925 O’Mahony. Owner Dan Rundell purchased this dilapidated diner in 1993 in Durham, Connecticut (where it was called Moe’s Diner or the Durham Diner) and spent 12 years restoring it to its former glory. A photo album in the diner tells the story, but I’m sure its proprietor would be happy to share. The ornate lattice in the windows is very classy.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Public House Diner in Quechee, Vermont

Public House Diner, at 5573 Woodstock Road in Quechee, Vermont, is a 1946 Worcester (#787). It was originally the Ross Diner located in Holyoke, Massachusetts. It closed in 1990 and moved to New Hampshire for a few short years before ultimately coming to Vermont. Since then, it’s had a succession of names, including the Yankee Diner, Farmer’s Diner, and the Quechee Diner. It reopened as the Public House in 2017 at Quechee Gorge Village, a tourist’s trap outside Quechee State Park.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Sugar Bowl Vintage Sign

Sugar Bowl Vintage Sign
The Sugar Bowl Restaurant, at 1494 Miner Street (U.S. Route 14) in Des Plaines, Illinois, was opened by Mr. and Mrs. Files as a soda fountain and candy store in 1921. They added a glorious neon sign in 1957.

It still retained some of its old features as a candy store when I visited as a kid in the late 1980s (I remember browsing the knickknacks and candy they sold), but owner Ted Vlahopoulos renovated the interior to look more like a traditional restaurant in 1997. Thankfully, Steve Morakalis and George Prassas kept this wonderful sign when they reopened it in 2009.

Ben and Jerry’s Flavor Graveyard

Ben and Jerry’s Flavor Graveyard
Ben and Jerry’s Flavor Graveyard at the Ben and Jerry’s Factory, 1281 Waterbury-Stowe Road in Waterbury, Washington County, Vermont. Ben & Jerry’s have discontinued hundreds of ice cream flavors over the years, but only a handful receive the honor of being interred in the Flavor Graveyard. Each headstone marks the dates the flavor was in circulation. Don’t despair, ice cream lovers, they’ve actually held “funerals” for our dearly departed favorites.