Southern Kitchen

Southern Kitchen
Cool neon sign for the Southern Kitchen, 9576 US Route 11 in New Market, Virginia.

Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland

Green Mount Cemetery, at 1501 Greenmount Avenue in Baltimore, Maryland, was dedicated in 1839 and contains the remains of approximately 65,000 former residents. While not as large as other rural cemeteries, Green Mount’s Gothic Revival structures and funerary art and sculpture are a sight to behold. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

Elijah Jefferson Bond (1847-1921)

Elijah Jefferson Bond (1847-1921) was a lawyer and inventor who patented a “spirit board”, or ouija board, in 1890. He served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and was a co-founder of the Kennard Novelty Company, which produced ouija boards for the growing Spiritualist movement. Bond married a Maryland woman named Mary Peters, and the couple had one child. They were buried in an unmarked grave until 2007, when an admirer located it and raised funds for this unique headstone.

Lawrason Riggs (1814-1884)

The bronze figure of a woman wrapped in a thin, flowing gown mourns over the graves of Lawrason Riggs (1814-1884) and Mary Turpin Bright Riggs (1837-1919) and their family. Mary, the daughter of Sen. Jesse D. Bright, was Lawrason’s third wife. Their Art Nouveau-style sculpture, titled “Memory” and installed in 1911, was designed by Hans Schuler, a graduate of the Rinehart School of Sculpture.

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Adirondack Hotel

Adirondack Hotel
The Adirondack Hotel, at 1245 Main Street in Long Lake, New York, is a true mountain lodge in the heart of the fabled Adirondacks. It was originally built in the 1850s, but reconstructed in 1900 after a devastating fire. The Adirondack Mountains have been a vacation destination for over a century. This picturesque region is home to 102 towns and villages and approximately 132,000 people. Seven to ten million tourists flock to this area annually to enjoy hunting, camping, boating, and fishing in the summer, skiing and snowboarding in winter, and to see the beautiful autumn colors in the fall.

Ready For Salvation

This lifelike white marble carving of a young girl holding a cluster of flowers in Forest Lawn Cemetery, 1411 Delaware Avenue in Buffalo, New York, is dedicated to Tacie Hannah Fargo (1865-1866), daughter of Jerome Freeman (1820-1883) and Hannah Watson (1821-1887) Fargo. Tacie died at the tender age of one year and nine months. Her likeness was carved by J. Sharkey. Jerome F. Fargo was a brother of William G. Fargo, co-founder of the Wells Fargo Company, and James Congdell Strong Fargo, president of the American Express Company.

Tacie Hannah Fargo (1865-1866)

A Tragic Fate

Memorial to Maj. Gen. Emory Upton (1839-1881) and his wife Emily Norwood Martin (1846-1870) in Fort Hill Cemetery, 19 Fort Street in Auburn, New York. Emory Upton was a Union officer in the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. He had a brilliant tactical mind, and developed a plan that briefly broke through Robert E. Lee’s defensive fortifications during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. He was brevetted Major General for his service.

After the war, he married 21-year-old Emily Norwood Martin, who died tragically of tuberculosis two years later. Emory was devastated by her loss, and never remarried. He committed suicide in 1881 after suffering severe headaches, possibly from a brain tumor. His biographer wrote, “History cannot furnish a brighter example of unselfish patriotism, or ambition unsullied by an ignoble thought or an unworthy deed.”

Maj. Gen. Emory Upton (1839-1881)
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