Green Mount Cemetery in Montpelier, Vermont

Green Mount Cemetery, at 250 State Street (U.S. Route 2) in the City of Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, was built in 1854 on terraces above the north bank of the Winooski River. Over 4,000 former residents are interred in this 35-acre burial ground, including at least four Congressional Medal of Honor recipients.

Photo by Michael Kleen

Austrian artist Karl Bitter designed this monument to John E. Hubbard (1847-1899) and called it “Thanatos” after the Greek god of death. Hubbard was a controversial figure. He allegedly duplicitously gained a sizable inheritance from his aunt, Fanny Hubbard Kellogg, who intended her wealth to benefit the City of Montpelier. The controversy surrounding the will tarnished Hubbard’s reputation.

Upon his death in 1899, Hubbard did leave the fortune to Montpelier, and some of his wealth went toward building a gate and chapel at Green Mount Cemetery. According to legend, bad luck will befall anyone foolish enough to sit on the figure’s lap (popularly called Black Agnus).

Angel of Salvation

This statue of an angel resting on her horn is a memorial to Benjamin (1832-1918) and Lucy Hubbard (1838–1899) Fifield. Benjamin Franklin Fifield was a Republican U.S. Senator who helped elect President James Garfield.

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What Glory Remains

Memorial for Brig. Gen. Griffin Alexander Stedman, Jr. (1838-1864) in Cedar Hill Cemetery, 453 Fairfield Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut. Stedman spent most of his military career as an officer in the 11th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He rose to the rank of colonel in 1864 and commanded a brigade in the XVIII Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was mortally wounded during the Siege of Petersburg and died on August 6, 1864. He was breveted the rank of brigadier general after his death and Fort Stedman was named in his honor.

What Glory Remains

Sorrow of Forgotten Pride

Sorrow of Forgotten Pride
The Haggerty Lion in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Designed by Thomas Haggerty for his brother, Michael (1960-1974), this bronze lion is a National Smithsonian registered sculptural landmark and a favorite destination for visitors to Oakwood Cemetery. The sculpture was placed here in 1982.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

Cochecton General Store

Cochecton General Store
Cochecton is a town Sullivan County, New York, along the Delaware River at the Pennsylvania border. It is part of the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River area, which is managed by the National Park Service. Built in 1860, Reilly’s Store was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. It reopened in 2002, but has once again closed. There are less people living in Cochecton today than when the store first opened 159 years ago.

Physician Heal Thyself

Physician Heal Thyself
Memorial to Charles Donley Miller (1895-1947) in Brookside Cemetery, at Watertown Center Loop and Brookside Drive, Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. This unique monument features a caduceus, the staff carried by Hermes in Greek mythology and used to symbolize commerce. It’s also sometimes incorrectly used to represent the medical trade, particularly ironic in this instance because the inscription around the pedestal reads: “homeopathic physician.”