The Store Famous Coke Sign

The Store Famous Coke Sign
Coca-Cola must be sponsoring The Store Famous, 406 Barrie Street in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. You don’t see these great corner stores much anymore.

Bitter Veils of Solemnity

Monument to James and Sarah Schermerhorn and family in Cortland Rural Cemetery, 110 Tompkins Street, Cortland, Cortland County, New York. James A. Schermerhorn was a lawyer of Dutch ancestry. His father had been a banker, legislator, and one-time mayor of Rochester, New York. At least ten Schermerhorns are buried in the shadow of this lovely granite monument.

Cortland Rural Cemetery was established in 1853. Its drive is lined with wonderfully informative interpretive signs with information about prominent burials, interesting monuments, and the materials from which those monuments were made.

Washington’s Tenement House

This house at 123 S Pitt Street in Alexandria, Virginia was built in 1763 by future President George Washington as a tenement, and was willed to his wife, Martha, upon his death in 1799. In 2017, owner Rick Garcia excavated an old well and cistern he discovered while renovating and found numerous historical artifacts.

Washington's Tenement House

Bohemian National Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois

Bohemian National Cemetery, at 5255 N. Pulaski Road in Chicago, Illinois, was created in 1877 by Chicago’s ethnic Czech community, and has since expanded to 126 acres. Approximately 120,000 of the city’s former residents are buried here, including victims of the SS Eastland shipwreck. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2006.

Bohemian Civil War Memorial

Erected in 1892, this bronze statue of a private in the Union Army holding an American flag is dedicated to the 18 Civil War veterans buried in Bohemian National Cemetery. It was designed by sculptor Joseph Klir and called the Bohemian Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument. Its inscription reads “Pro Novou Vlast”, or “for the new country”. Like many immigrant groups, Czechs fought on both sides, though primarily for the North.

Kropacek

This beautiful neoclassical granite statue of a cloaked woman is a tribute to Vincencie Kropacek (1863-1944) and her husband, Jan Kropacek (1860-1906). The woman stands next to a pedestal with a vase or urn. She appears to be holding reeds or palms in her right hand.

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Only This and Nothing More

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was a master of early Victorian horror and detective literature, and one of my favorite authors. His works include “The Raven,” “The Black Cat,” “The Tell-Tale Heart,” and many more. When he died penniless in 1849, he was buried in an unmarked grave in the Westminster Presbyterian Church cemetery.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)

His fans raised funds, and architect George A. Frederick designed a monument for Poe in 1871, and it was dedicated in 1875. Poe was exhumed and reburied near the front of the churchyard. In 1913, a man named Orrin C. Painter placed another stone marking Poe’s original burial site.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)

The Historic Wayside Inn

The Historic Wayside Inn
Sign for the Wayside Inn, 7783 Main Street (U.S. Route 11) in Middletown, Virginia. This establishment first opened in 1797 and was known as Wilkenson’s Tavern. Jacob Larrick bought the inn and renamed it Larrick’s Hotel, after himself. In the early 1900s, a new owner expanded and modernized the hotel and called it the Wayside Inn. Today it’s owned and operated by Becky and George Reeves.