Fields of Pestilent Grief

Fields of Pestilent Grief
Headstone for 1LT William H. Pohlman (1842-1863) in Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York. William served as an adjutant in the 59th NY Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the 3rd Brigade, Second Division, II Corps of the Union Army of the Potomac. He was wounded twice at the Battle of Gettysburg, the second time during Pickett’s Charge, when the 59th NY repelled elements of Kemper’s Brigade from their position south of the stone wall on Cemetery Ridge. He died of his wounds on July 21, 1863.
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Antwerp Ruins

Antwerp Ruins
The Village of Antwerp on the Indian River in Upstate New York has seen better days. Its population has dwindled from a 1920 height of over 1,000 residents. The village main street is now a historic district, but its storefronts are crumbling and abandoned. These brick buildings date to 1889. Antwerp gets its name from the Antwerp company of Belgium, which was part owner in the early 1800s. Despite the dilapidated main street, you can still find beautiful Victorian homes throughout the town.

Swansong of My Heart

Swansong of My Heart
Monument to Lazelle A. Michael (1852-1939) and his wives, Emma J. (1852-1907), Carolyn E. (1870-1915), and Virginia L. (1876-1926), in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. This monument fascinates me, not just because Emma and Virginia were sisters (and clearly the two women depicted in stone), but because I can’t find any information on this family beyond a patent Lazelle filed for an ice cream scoop in 1905. If you know the story behind this monument, please contact me!

The name of Lazelle’s first wife, Emma, is wrapped in grape vines, and the inscription reads:

Abiding faith in immortal hope of glorious reunion.

Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, Connecticut

Cedar Hill Cemetery, at 453 Fairfield Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut, is a historic rural cemetery designed by landscape architect Jacob Weidenmann and opened in 1866. Its picturesque grounds encompass 270 acres and are the final resting place for over 32,000 of the city’s former residents, including multiple U.S. Congressmen, Connecticut governors, and Civil War generals.

Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel

Samuel Colt (1814-1862), inventor and industrialist, had an incalculable impact on American history. He invented the Colt .45 caliber six-shot single action revolver, which became an iconic firearm in the American West. It was called “The Equalizer” and “The Peacemaker.” Though not the most popular firearm in its day, it came to represent the rugged individualism of America in popular culture. His enormous neoclassical column of polished granite is a testament to his impact.

The Past Is Like A Funeral

This bronze neoclassical sculpture is dedicated to the David (1806-1889) and Julia (1810-1892) Clark family. The couple had six children, only one of whom, Mary, outlived their mother.

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