What Glory Remains

Memorial for Brig. Gen. Griffin Alexander Stedman, Jr. (1838-1864) in Cedar Hill Cemetery, 453 Fairfield Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut. Stedman spent most of his military career as an officer in the 11th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He rose to the rank of colonel in 1864 and commanded a brigade in the XVIII Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was mortally wounded during the Siege of Petersburg and died on August 6, 1864. He was breveted the rank of brigadier general after his death and Fort Stedman was named in his honor.

What Glory Remains
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Sorrow of Forgotten Pride

Sorrow of Forgotten Pride
The Haggerty Lion in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Designed by Thomas Haggerty for his brother, Michael (1960-1974), this bronze lion is a National Smithsonian registered sculptural landmark and a favorite destination for visitors to Oakwood Cemetery. The sculpture was placed here in 1982.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

Physician Heal Thyself

Physician Heal Thyself
Memorial to Charles Donley Miller (1895-1947) in Brookside Cemetery, at Watertown Center Loop and Brookside Drive, Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. This unique monument features a caduceus, the staff carried by Hermes in Greek mythology and used to symbolize commerce. It’s also sometimes incorrectly used to represent the medical trade, particularly ironic in this instance because the inscription around the pedestal reads: “homeopathic physician.”

Swan Point Cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island

Swan Point Cemetery, at 585 Blackstone Boulevard in Providence, Rhode Island, is a private rural cemetery established in 1846. It was one of the country’s first rural cemeteries, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. It encompasses 200 acres and is the final resting place for approximately 42,000 of the city’s former residents. Swan Point contains many beautiful bronze and white marble sculptures.

Troubled Mind

Monument to William Clarke Sayles (1855-1876), son of William F. and Mary W. Sayles. William Francis Sayles was a textile manufacturer, state senator, and trustee of Brown University. His son, William, died as a young man at the age of twenty. He is portrayed as a scholar wrapped in robes in this bronze statue.

Once a Dream

This hauntingly beautiful white marble moment is dedicated to Mary Waterman (1850-1860) and William Comstock (1857-1860), children of Byron and Harriet Sprague. Their epitaph reads, in part: “Farewell darlings we have laid you side by side beneath this sod, buds of earth all fadeless blooming in the garden of our God.” Byron Sprague was a businessman and real estate mogul.

Continue reading “Swan Point Cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island”

Unchain the Thunder

Monument to Col. John Stanton Slocum (1824-1861) in Swan Point Cemetery, 585 Blackstone Blvd in Providence, Rhode Island. Slocum commanded the 2nd Rhode Island Infantry Regiment and was killed on July 21, 1861 at the First Battle of Bull Run. The 2nd RI was deployed in Burnside’s Brigade, which initially drove Confederate forces back during the opening phase of the battle.

Unchain the Thunder

Pray for the Dead

Pray For The Dead
A beautiful sculpture of the Virgin Mary in St. Mary’s Cemetery on James Street, south of Clayton, New York in Jefferson County. The monument commemorates the Lanther family. It also depicts a serpent being crushed under Mary’s foot.

Clayton is a quaint town along the St. Lawrence River with an antique boat museum and a few shops along the river. If you visit, don’t miss 1000 Islands River Rat Cheese farther up James Street, downtown.