Child in Silence

Child in Silence
Headstone for Eunice Denison (unk-1809) in Cherry Hill Cemetery at Main Street and Christian Hill Road, north of the White River and east of Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont. This well-preserved black slate marker has me wondering if it’s a duplicate or has been cleaned recently. At 210 years and counting, this is one of the oldest headstones I’ve seen in Vermont.

The inscription (from Matthew 18:4) reads:

Whosoever shalt humble
himself as a little child
the same is greatest in
the kingdom of heaven.

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Body of Clay

Body of Clay
Monument to Jane L. Redfield (1827-1899) in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Her father, Lewis Hamilton Redfield (1792-1882) was a wealthy printer. Jane had six siblings and was never married (that I can determine). This statue was erected by her sister, Margaret Tredwell Redfield Smith.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

Graceland Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois

Established in 1860 by Thomas Bryan, Graceland Cemetery, at 4001 N. Clark Street in Chicago, Illinois, is the city’s premier burial ground. Approximately 45,000 people are interred in these 121 acres, including many of Chicago’s most prominent former citizens, including Cyrus McCormick, George Pullman, John Altgeld, and Allan Pinkerton.

Remnants of the Only Delight

This lovely neoclassical bronze monument is dedicated to department store mogul Marshall Field (1834-1906). Field rose from farmer’s son to wealthiest man in Chicago when he got into the merchandising business and eventually established Marshall Field and Company. Marshall Field and John D. Rockefeller founded the University of Chicago in 1890. The statue of a sitting woman holding oak leaves (symbolizing courage), called “Memory”, was designed by architect Henry Bacon and sculptor Daniel Chester French.

In the Hands of Storm

This Granite knight, designed by Lorado Taft and called “Crusader”, commemorates Victor Fremont Lawson (1850-1920), Norwegian-American publisher of the Chicago Daily News. Lawson ran the Daily News for 29 years. His monument is unmarked, except for the epitaph: “Above al things truth beareth away the victory.”

Continue reading “Graceland Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois”

Past Shadows

Past Shadows
Monument to Big. Gen. Gustavus Sniper (1836-1894) in Woodlawn Cemetery, 800 Grant Boulevard, Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Sniper was colonel of the 185th New York Volunteer Infantry.

He was brevetted brigadier general on March 13, 1865 for “conspicuous gallantry in the battles of the Quaker Road and White Oak Road, Virginia.” These battles were fought at the opening of the Appomattox Campaign southwest of Petersburg, Virginia. The 185th NY was in Joshua L. Chamberlain’s (of Gettysburg fame) brigade of the First Division, V Corps.

Benighted

Benighted
This inscription lines an almost Tim Burtonesque Gothic sarcophagus for Barrett Rich White (1848-1877) in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Like many members of the White clan, Barrett died at a relatively young age. The inscription is from Psalm 26:8, it reads:

“LORD, I have loved the habitation of thy house, and the place where thine honour dwelleth.”

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

One Last Time

One Last Time
Monument to Brig. Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr in Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York. Adolph von Steinwehr (1822-1877) was born in the Duchy of Brunswick, trained as a Prussian officer, and emigrated to America in 1847.

He raised a German-American regiment during the Civil War and rose to command a division in the Union XI Corps, Army of the Potomac. Unfortunately, his division bore the brunt of successful Confederate attacks at the Battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and he was later demoted to command of a brigade. After the war, he became a well-known and respected cartographer.