Left Unspoken

Left Unspoken
Monument to Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Carr in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. During the Civil War, Carr commanded a brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac at the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg.

He was wounded near the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg and went on to command a division in the Union Army of the James. He was promoted to major general in March 1865, just before the end of the war. He also served as Secretary of State of New York for five years.

This 300-acre cemetery was established in 1848 and designed in rural style. It offers a beautiful view of the Hudson Valley and contains the remains of over 16,000 people, including Samuel “Uncle Sam” Wilson.
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The Funeral Portrait

The Funeral Portrait
Bronze door knocker on the Crouse family mausoleum in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. John Crouse (1802-1889) was a corpulent German-American grocer and banker who established the “John Crouse Memorial College for Women” at Syracuse University. He was once the wealthiest citizen of Syracuse, estimated to be worth $10 million in 1889. His son, John J. Crouse, Jr. (1834-1886), became mayor of Syracuse.

A gruesome spectacle unfolded in 1988, nearly a century after John, Jr.’s death, when a Syracuse University student stole his skull for art class. His fellow students called the cops when a foul smell from his attempt at cleaning the skull permeated their dorm. When investigators traced it back to the Crouse mausoleum, they discovered vandals had destroyed the interior, smashed coffins, and scattered body parts all over the floor. What a bunch of animals.

Oakwood Cemetery in Syracuse, New York

Oakwood Cemetery, at 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 acres. This is by far the most interesting cemetery I’ve ever visited in the U.S., with Gothic and Victorian mausoleums and family plots dotting undulating, wooded hills. It’s positively Tim Burtonesque in some areas.

Time Waits for No One

Henry Winfield Chapin (1867-1954) and his wife Marie Arnold Chapin (1873-1956) are interred in the shadow of these beautiful Greek Corinthian columns. Henry was president of the Brown-Lipe Chapin Company, which manufactured automobile parts for Ford Motors and Yellow Cab.

Patterns in the Ivy

Broken headstone for Marion Strong White (1844-1875). Marion was the wife of Horace K. White. She was a wealthy and by all accounts graceful and intelligent socialite, and died of illness at the young age of 30.

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Fields of Pestilent Grief

Fields of Pestilent Grief
Headstone for 1LT William H. Pohlman (1842-1863) in Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York. William served as an adjutant in the 59th NY Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the 3rd Brigade, Second Division, II Corps of the Union Army of the Potomac. He was wounded twice at the Battle of Gettysburg, the second time during Pickett’s Charge, when the 59th NY repelled elements of Kemper’s Brigade from their position south of the stone wall on Cemetery Ridge. He died of his wounds on July 21, 1863.

Swansong of My Heart

Swansong of My Heart
Monument to Lazelle A. Michael (1852-1939) and his wives, Emma J. (1852-1907), Carolyn E. (1870-1915), and Virginia L. (1876-1926), in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. This monument fascinates me, not just because Emma and Virginia were sisters (and clearly the two women depicted in stone), but because I can’t find any information on this family beyond a patent Lazelle filed for an ice cream scoop in 1905. If you know the story behind this monument, please contact me!

The name of Lazelle’s first wife, Emma, is wrapped in grape vines, and the inscription reads:

Abiding faith in immortal hope of glorious reunion.

Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, Connecticut

Cedar Hill Cemetery, at 453 Fairfield Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut, is a historic rural cemetery designed by landscape architect Jacob Weidenmann and opened in 1866. Its picturesque grounds encompass 270 acres and are the final resting place for over 32,000 of the city’s former residents, including multiple U.S. Congressmen, Connecticut governors, and Civil War generals.

Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel

Samuel Colt (1814-1862), inventor and industrialist, had an incalculable impact on American history. He invented the Colt .45 caliber six-shot single action revolver, which became an iconic firearm in the American West. It was called “The Equalizer” and “The Peacemaker.” Though not the most popular firearm in its day, it came to represent the rugged individualism of America in popular culture. His enormous neoclassical column of polished granite is a testament to his impact.

The Past Is Like A Funeral

This bronze neoclassical sculpture is dedicated to the David (1806-1889) and Julia (1810-1892) Clark family. The couple had six children, only one of whom, Mary, outlived their mother.

Continue reading “Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, Connecticut”