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Historic America Photography

Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery in Wilmington, Delaware

Visit the final resting place of two Continental Congressmen, Civil War generals, and even a Cherokee chief.

Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery, 701 Delaware Avenue in Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, is a small rural cemetery established in 1843. It encompasses a rectangular area of 25 acres, relatively flat on its western side with a steep eastern descent toward Brandywine Creek. It is the final resting place for over 21,000 former residents, including Richard Bassett, a signer of the U.S. Constitution, governors, congressmen, and even a Cherokee chief.

Gunning Bedford, Jr. (1747-1812)

Gunning Bedford, Jr. (1747-1812) was a member of the Continental Congress, Delaware’s State Attorney General, and a signer of the U.S. Constitution. Bedford was born and raised in Philadelphia, then attended the College of New Jersey (aka Princeton University). He briefly served as an aid to George Washington during the Revolutionary War.

John McKinly (1721-1796)
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To Mourn is a Virtue

This graceful neoclassical bronze door opens to the Duda mausoleum in Bohemian National Cemetery, 5255 N. Pulaski Road in Chicago, Illinois. Joseph Frank (1870-1950) and Albine T. Wolf (1872-1931) Duda were born in Bohemia (now the Czech Republic) and emigrated to the United States. Joseph was a clothier in Chicago until his retirement. The couple had three children.

Duda
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Crowning Angel

Monument to Marcellus Edward McDowell (1837-1891), Jane Berlin McDowell Vansant (1844-1916), William J. McLaughlin (1853-1936), and Martha Banks McDowell McLaughlin (1872-1958) in Laurel Hill Cemetery, 3822 Ridge Avenue in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Marcellus was a partner in Blackwell’s Durham Tobacco Company, a successor to the company that produced the famous Bull Durham Tobacco. Their advertising campaign saw Bull Durham painted on the sides of brick buildings all over the United States, many of which can still be seen today.

Marcellus Edward McDowell (1837-1891)
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The Shadow I Once Kissed

This striking gothic monument to Samuel Fletcher Pratt (1807-1872), his wife Mary Jane Strong (1815-1886), and their family in Forest Lawn Cemetery, at 1411 Delaware Avenue in Buffalo, New York, features five full-scale granite statues. Pratt & Company, a hardware store later expanded to include iron and steel production, was at one time the most prominent business in Buffalo.

Samuel Fletcher Pratt (1807-1872)

S.F. Pratt bought out his partner’s share of the company in 1836. In 1844, he became president of the Buffalo Gaslight Company, and went on to found Buffalo Female Seminary. Samuel and Mary had two daughters, Jeannie (1841–1872) and Helen (1843–1873).

Samuel Fletcher Pratt (1807-1872)
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When Lambs Become Lions

James C. Hudgins family mausoleum in Elmwood Cemetery, 238 E. Princess Anne Road in Norfolk, Virginia. Lions represent courage, majesty, and valor (among other things), and guard tombs against evil spirits.

James C. Hudgins Mausoleum
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The Way of all Flesh

An angelic granite monument to Edouard Masson (1896-1974), his wife Germaine Smith (1898-1944), and their children in Cimetière Notre-Dame-des-Neiges, at 4601 Côte-des-Neiges Road in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Edouard and Germaine married in 1929. Edouard, a carpenter’s son, was a lawyer and member of the Legislative Council of Quebec for the Union Nationale Party from 1953 to 1967.

Edouard Masson (1896-1974) II
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Photography

Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis, Indiana

Established in 1863, Crown Hill Funeral Home and Cemetery at 700 38th Street in Indianapolis, Indiana, sprawls across 555 acres, making it the third largest private cemetery in the United States. Indianapolis architect Adolph Scherrer designed its triple-arch Gothic gatehouse at 34th Street and Boulevard Place in 1885. Crown Hill is the final resting place for one U.S. president, three vice presidents, and several governors, U.S. Senators, U.S. Representatives, industrialists, military generals, and over 190,000 other former residents. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

Brig. Gen. Abel D. Streight (1828-1892)

Monument to Brig. Gen. Abel Delos Streight (1828-1892) and family. Streight grew up in New York and moved to Indianapolis to open a publishing business just before the Civil War. He became colonel of the 51st Indiana Infantry Regiment and conducted Streight’s Raid in 1863, when he was captured and later released. He was brevetted Brigadier General after the war and served as a state senator.

Corliss Randle Ruckle (1877-1889) II

Monument to Corliss Randle Ruckle (1877-1889). Corliss was the son of Nicholas and Jane Charlotte Ruckle. He died of diphtheria at 12 years of age.