Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site

This small park and museum commemorates the only Revolutionary War battle fought in what would become the State of Vermont.

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The Battle of Hubbardton was fought on July 7, 1777 between British and German forces commanded by Brigadier General Simon Fraser and Baron Friedrich Adolf Riedesel and American forces commanded by colonels Ebenezer Francis, Nathan Hale, and Seth Warner near Hubbardton, Vermont during the Revolutionary War. The British won the battle but failed to follow up their victory.

In June 1777, British Lt. Gen. John Burgoyne headed south along Lake Champlain in one prong of a multi-pronged attack designed to split New England from the rest of the American Colonies. On July 5, the British recaptured Fort Ticonderoga after hauling artillery up to the summit of Mount Defiance. The roughly 4,000-strong American garrison fled without a fight. Major General Arthur St. Clair left Colonel Seth Warner of the Green Mountain Boys Regiment near Hubbardton with a 1,200-man rearguard while the main body continued its southern retreat.

Brig. Gen. Simon Fraser, commanding some 1,030 of Burgoyne’s most experienced troops, including German Brunswick jägers and grenadiers, was in hot pursuit. They initially surprised Warner’s rearguard in the early morning hours, but the Americans regrouped on a hill and put up stubborn resistance. Though wounded, Colonel Francis of the 11th Massachusetts Regiment directed his men to attack a vulnerable point on the British left flank.

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Springfield Royal Diner in Springfield, Vermont

Springfield Royal Diner, at 363 River Street in Springfield, Vermont, is a rare 1957 Mahony (one of four manufactured by the O’Mahony Diner Company), originally known as the Royal Diner and located in Kingston, New York. Owner Matt Aldrich brought it to Springfield, Vermont in 2002 and restored it to compliment his Corvette Museum. The museum in no longer open, but you can still enjoy this nostalgic diner.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Miss Bellows Falls in Bellows Falls, Vermont

Miss Bellows Falls, at 90 Rockingham Street in Bellows Falls, Vermont, is a 1930s Worcester Lunch Car (#771). It is the only intact example of the barrel-roofed Worcester Diner in Vermont. John Korsak and Frank Willie originally opened the diner in Lowell, Massachusetts as Frankie & Johnny’s, and Francis A. “Frank” Cutler brought the diner to its current location in 1942. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Child in Silence

Child in Silence
Headstone for Eunice Denison (unk-1809) in Cherry Hill Cemetery at Main Street and Christian Hill Road, north of the White River and east of Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont. This well-preserved black slate marker has me wondering if it’s a duplicate or has been cleaned recently. At 210 years and counting, this is one of the oldest headstones I’ve seen in Vermont.

The inscription (from Matthew 18:4) reads:

Whosoever shalt humble
himself as a little child
the same is greatest in
the kingdom of heaven.

Fort Dummer in Brattleboro, Vermont

A roadside marker is all that remains of this colonial-era fort that played a role in an obscure New England war.

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The Battle of Fort Dummer was fought on October 11, 1724 between Abenaki Indians and Massachusetts colonial militia and their Mohawk allies during Dummer’s War. Both the fort and the war were named after Lieutenant Governor William Dummer, acting governor of Massachusetts at that time. Though the attackers managed to kill a few of the fort’s defenders, the fort held and remained a local stronghold.

The Abenaki were members of the Wabanaki Confederacy, an alliance of Algonquin-speaking Indians including the Mi’kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, and Penobscot. After war broke out in 1722, Lieutenant Governor William Dummer ordered the creation of several forts on the frontier along the Connecticut River. Fort Dummer, a 180-foot wooden stockade, was built in 1724. It was the first permanent English Settlement in what would become Vermont.

Lieutenant Timothy Dwight took command of 12 cannon, 43 English soldiers, and 12 Mohawk warriors at the outpost. Shortly after completion, a group of approximately 70 Abenaki warriors attacked. The band was affiliated with Chief Grey Lock, who was waging his own fight against the British sometimes called “Grey Lock’s War”. They killed or wounded five of the defenders, but could not penetrate the thick wooden walls.

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Chelsea Royal Diner in West Brattleboro, Vermont

Chelsea Royal Diner, at 487 Marlboro Road in West Brattleboro, Vermont, is a 1939 Worcester Diner (#736) moved here from downtown West Brattleboro. The 1958 sign was discovered in a New Hampshire barn and restored in 1999. The staff takes pride in its locally sourced food and homemade “Royal Madness” Ice Cream.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

T. J. Buckley’s in Brattleboro, Vermont

T. J. Buckley’s, at 132 Elliot Street in Brattleboro, Vermont, is a restored 1925 Worcester Dining Car (#424) owned by chef Michael Fuller. Don’t look for the usual diner fair at T.J. Buckley’s. It was originally located in Woburn, Massachusetts but moved to Brattleboro in the 1950s.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources