Forts Clinton and Montgomery Battlefield

The Hudson Highlands were once the scene of a heroic last stand at two forts in the shadow of Bear Mountain, New York, unbeknownst to thousands of families visiting the Trailside Zoo each year.

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The Battle of Forts Clinton and Montgomery (aka Battle of the Hudson Highlands) was fought on October 6, 1777 between British forces commanded by Maj. Gen. Sir Henry Clinton and Maj. Gen. John Vaughan and American forces commanded by Brig. Gen. George Clinton and Brig. Gen. James Clinton at the junction of Popolopen Creek and the Hudson River during the American Revolutionary War. The battle was a hollow victory for the British due to Maj. Gen. John Burgoyne’s surrender at Saratoga later that month.

After the Battle of Freeman’s Farm (or First Saratoga), the British and American armies sat licking their wounds. British Maj. Gen. John Burgoyne’s 5,000 supply-starved men hugged the Hudson River near Saratoga, New York. In late September, Maj. Gen. Sir Henry Clinton moved his 3,100-man army north to relieve Burgoyne and open the Hudson River to British ships. Standing in his way was New York Governor George Clinton with 600 men and 20 artillery pieces at Fort Clinton and Fort Montgomery, plus the warships Montgomery and Congress and three smaller vessels.

British Maj. Gen. Clinton split his army in two in order to assault both forts simultaneously by land. Nine hundred men under Lt. Col. Archibald Campbell were to attack Fort Montgomery and 1,200 men under Clinton and Maj. Gen. John Vaughan would attack Fort Clinton. They would be supported by seven ships on the Hudson.

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White Rose Diner in Linden, New Jersey

White Rose Diner, at 1301 E. Elizabeth Avenue in Linden, New Jersey, is a Kullman model once part of a defunct family-owned burger chain called the White Rose System. Robert and Jack Hemmings and their cousin Jim Hemmings opened the first White Rose System in the 1950s in Highland Park, New Jersey and eventually owned three separate restaurants by 1972. Rich Belfer has owned the one in Linden since the early 1990s. The diner specializes in sliders served on a Kaiser roll topped with onions.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

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Tony’s Freehold Grill in Freehold, New Jersey

Tony’s Freehold Grill, at 59 E. Main Street in Freehold, New Jersey, is a 1947 O’Mahony that (unlike many classic diners) has sat at the same location since it opened, making it one of those small town staples. Its current owners/operators, Tom and Peter Iliadis, took the reins from their father, Tony, in 1986. Tony Iliadis started at the Freehold Grill as a cook in 1961, and eventually took ownership and re-christened it after himself.

This diner is only open for breakfast and lunch. It serves a sandwich called “The Trump Tower”, featuring corned beef and roasted turkey, coleslaw, Russian dressing, and melted Swiss cheese on grilled rye. Russian dressing? Hmmm…

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

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One Last Time

One Last Time
Monument to Brig. Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr in Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York. Adolph von Steinwehr (1822-1877) was born in the Duchy of Brunswick, trained as a Prussian officer, and emigrated to America in 1847.

He raised a German-American regiment during the Civil War and rose to command a division in the Union XI Corps, Army of the Potomac. Unfortunately, his division bore the brunt of successful Confederate attacks at the Battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and he was later demoted to command of a brigade. After the war, he became a well-known and respected cartographer.

Albany Rural Cemetery in Menands, New York

Designed by Major David Bates Douglass and established in 1841, Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York, is a 467-acre National Historic Landmark and the final resting place for over 135,000 people. According to the Times-Union, 55 Albany mayors, five New York governors, 34 congressmen, eight presidential cabinet members, and one president, Chester Alan Arthur, are buried here. You can easily spend days exploring the grounds.

Monument to President Chester A. Arthur (1829-1886). Arthur, then vice president, became the 21st President of the United States in 1881 after President James A. Garfield succumbed to complications stemming from an assassin’s bullet. Generally forgotten today among the pantheon of presidents, Arthur competently led the country through an uneventful 4-year term.

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Fields of Pestilent Grief

Fields of Pestilent Grief
Headstone for 1LT William H. Pohlman (1842-1863) in Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York. William served as an adjutant in the 59th NY Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the 3rd Brigade, Second Division, II Corps of the Union Army of the Potomac. He was wounded twice at the Battle of Gettysburg, the second time during Pickett’s Charge, when the 59th NY repelled elements of Kemper’s Brigade from their position south of the stone wall on Cemetery Ridge. He died of his wounds on July 21, 1863.

Eveready Diner in Hyde Park, New York

Eveready Diner, at 4184 U.S. Route 9 North (Albany Post Road), in Hyde Park, New York. According to nydiners.com, the Eveready is a 1995 Paramount model, #174. Paramount is a New Jersey company known for pioneering stainless steel exteriors. I love this retro design incorporating populux and doo wop elements.

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