Categories
Historic America Photography

Stories in Stone: Louis Schwitzer

Detail on the door of a neoclassical mausoleum for Louis Schwitzer (1880-1967) and Sophie Rampp Schwitzer (1889-1935) at Crown Hill Funeral Home and Cemetery, 700 38th Street in Indianapolis, Indiana. Louis Schwitzer was born in an area of Poland then part of the Astro-Hungarian Empire, where he earned master’s degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. He immigrated to the United States and went on to found the Schwitzer Corporation in Indianapolis. He was an engineer, not a race car driver, but he did win the first race held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Sophie Rampp Schwitzer (1889-1935)
Categories
Historic America Photography

Thomas Farm

The Thomas Farm on Monocacy National Battlefield, 4632 Araby Church Road (Visitor Center) outside Frederick, Maryland. The farm was owned by Christian Keefer Thomas and is a treasure trove of Civil War history. Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock once used its brick farmhouse as a headquarters as his corps marched north to Gettysburg. On July 9, 1864, the farm was the scene of fierce fighting during the Battle of Monocacy. That fall, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant held a council of war at the house with his cavalry chief, Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan.

Categories
Historic America Photography

Worthington Farmhouse

The Worthington Farmhouse on Monocacy National Battlefield, 4632 Araby Church Road (Visitor Center) outside Frederick, Maryland. On July 9, 1864, Confederate forces under Brig. Gen. John McCausland crossed the Monocacy River and clashed with Union Brig. Gen. James B. Ricketts’ brigade on the farm of John T. Worthington while Worthington and his frightened family huddled inside their home.

Categories
Historic America Photography

Stories in Stone: Edward Fay Claypool

Mausoleum for Edward Fay Claypool (1832-1911) and family at Crown Hill Funeral Home and Cemetery, 700 38th Street in Indianapolis, Indiana. Edward Fay Claypool was a banker and investor who helped finance the opulent Claypool Hotel and the Herron-Morton Place neighborhood in Indianapolis. He married Mary Catherine Morrow in 1855.

Categories
Photography

Stories in Stone: James Whitcomb Riley

Monument to poet James Whitcomb Riley (1849-1916) and family at Crown Hill Funeral Home and Cemetery, 700 38th Street in Indianapolis, Indiana. Riley was born in Indiana and spent the first part of his life as a ne’er-do-well, working odd jobs until finally settling in as a newspaper editor. His children’s poems “Little Orphant Annie” and “The Raggedy Man” inspired the popular characters Little Orphan Annie and Raggedy Ann. He later founded the Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis.

Categories
Photography Roadside America

Wheeling Office Supply Brick Ad

Brick ad for Wheeling Office Supply Co, 1420 Market St, Wheeling, West Virginia. Been in business since 1945, so this technically isn’t a ghost sign.

Categories
Historic America

Boonsboro Battlefield in Washington County, Maryland

This cavalry brawl, largest since the Battle of Gettysburg, bought Robert E. Lee’s defeated army time to escape.

The Battle of Boonsboro was fought on July 8, 1863 between Union cavalry commanded by Brig. Gens. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick and John Buford and Confederate cavalry commanded by Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart in Washington County, Maryland during the American Civil War. This inconclusive skirmish followed the Army of Northern Virginia’s retreat from Gettysburg and resulted in approximately 214 total casualties.

After three bloody days of fighting around Gettysburg, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee retreated southwest toward the Potomac River and Virginia. The main army settled into defensive works around Williamsport, Maryland, while a rearguard was stationed in Hagerstown and nearby Funkstown. Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart was tasked with keeping the Union army at bay while Confederate forces found passage across the swollen river.