Blog Archives

Gettysburg 2017: Pickett’s Charge

In this installment of my video blog documenting my recent trip to Gettysburg National Military Park, I explore the main Confederate attack on July 3, 1863: Pickett’s Charge. Longstreet’s attack on the Union center at Gettysburg is stuff of legend, but even at the time most observers knew it wouldn’t succeed, including Longstreet himself. Years later, when asked why the attack failed, George Pickett replied, “I’ve always thought the Yankees had something to do with it.”

Gettysburg 2017: The Town

In this installment of my video blog documenting my recent trip to Gettysburg National Military Park, I explore the Borough of Gettysburg. While Gettysburg is noted for its history, and I certainly spent a lot of time on the battlefield, it’s also an interesting destination itself. Shops selling antiques and memorabilia line the streets, and of course there are several historical and haunted tours. I can’t imagine a more picturesque town, keep alive by over one million visitors to the battlefield each year.

High Tide at the Angle

Gettysburg National Military Park, 1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325. (717) 334-1124.

Gettysburg 2017: Little Round Top and Sickle’s Salient

In this installment of my video blog documenting my recent trip to Gettysburg National Military Park, I explore key sites of the fight on July 2, 1863: Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Peach Orchard, and Cemetery Ridge. Longstreet’s attack on the Union left flank at Gettysburg is probably one of the most famous of the war. It was only quick action by Union commanders that saved the day.

Gettysburg 2017: Culp’s Hill and Cemetery Hill

In this installment of my video blog documenting my recent trip to Gettysburg National Military Park, I explore key sites of the fight for Culp’s Hill and Cemetery Hill on July 2, 1863. That evening, Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s Corps demonstrated against the Union left flank, but this became a sideshow, gaining nothing but additions to the casualty roles. It’s interesting to explore the battlefield’s lesser-known quarter.

Gettysburg 2017: Day 1

In this installment of my video blog documenting my recent trip to Gettysburg National Military Park, I explore key sites of the first day of battle, July 1, 1863: McPherson Ridge, Barlow’s Knoll, the death of General John F. Reynolds, and capture of Brig. General Archer. I’ve learned a lot about this important Civil War battle, but I also learned not to eat a powdered doughnut before recording a vlog.

Gettysburg 2017: The Drive

I spent a weekend in Gettysburg in early November 2017 and decided to make a vlog documenting the trip. While Gettysburg is noted for its history, and I certainly spent a lot of time on the battlefield, it’s also an interesting destination itself. I had an amazing homemade meal at the Dutch Kitchen in Frackville on the way there. Join me as I explore many aspects of the Gettysburg battlefield.

Gettysburg by Stephen W. Sears

In Gettysburg, Stephen W. Sears charts the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3 to July 24, 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s second invasion of the North during the American Civil War. The campaign culminated in the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, in which approximately 48,000 Americans became casualties. In the end, nothing was gained except these men added to the casualties rolls.

No two armies could have been more similar and yet more different than the Army of the Potomac and Army of Northern Virginia. For the first time, the two armies neared manpower parity. While Lee’s army was supremely confident, even contemptuous of its opponents, George G. Meade’s army had no illusions about the coming fight. Its men were eager to prove they could win a victory.

Where Lee’s command was rife with disagreement, miscommunication, apathy, and poor decision making, with some exceptions the leadership of the Army of the Potomac had its finest hour. Sears convincingly demonstrates that the Union army’s leadership simply out classed their counterparts, at least on this battlefield.

Much has been made over the years of Confederate cavalry commander Maj. General J.E.B. Stuart’s absence during the critical days leading up to the battle. Sears in some ways exonerates Stuart. Stuart was following Lee’s orders when he rode around the Union army, capturing supplies and disrupting communications.

“The very concept of Stuart’s expedition was fueled by overconfidence and misjudgment at the highest command level,” he argued. While frustrated with Stuart’s absence, Lee made no effort to rectify the situation until after the battle was underway.

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