Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio

Designed by Architect Howard Daniels and established in 1848, Green Lawn Cemetery, at 1000 Greenlawn Avenue in Columbus, Ohio, is a historic private rural cemetery. Its meandering roads wander 360 acres, where over 155,000 are interred, including Samuel Bush, grandfather of President George H.W. Bush and great-grandfather of President George W. Bush, and World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker.

Hayden Mausoleum

The Hayden mausoleum is a centerpiece of Green Lawn Cemetery. It was designed by Ohio architect Frank Packard and built at a modern-day cost of approximately $2.5 million. Built for banker Charles H. Hayden (1837-1920) and his family, it is made from granite and white marble, and its interior sarcophagi were made in Italy. It is truly impressive.

The Fisherman

I love this bronze statue of an old fisherman, erected in the memory of Emil Ambos (1844-1898). Emil was the son of Peter Ambos, a talented German confectioner who became a wealthy banker and industrialist. The statue used to be holding two fish, but apparently both have been stolen.

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National Museum of the United States Air Force

Aircraft fanatics and lovers of all military history will enjoy this collection of historic aircraft. See the airplanes that made history, including one that dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki in 1945.

It’s no secret I prefer my feet firmly planted on the ground. I love military history, but air warfare holds no particular appeal for me. Still, it was hard to pass up an opportunity to see the National Museum of the United States Air Force on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in western Ohio. I was thoroughly impressed by its collection of historic aircraft, particularly from the Second World War. The WW2 bomber “Memphis Belle” was finally on display.

Photo by Michael Kleen

The museum spans several large interconnected Air Force hangers and features examples from all periods of militarized flight. You could spend hours getting lost among the displays. The Early Years Gallery includes a World War 1 era British observation balloon, and a dog fighting German Fokker Dr. I and U.S. Thomas-Morse S4C Scout.

Photo by Michael Kleen

The World War II Gallery is the most interesting and expansive. The museum has examples of a wide variety of fighters and bombers, including experimental German jet aircraft like the Messerschmitt Me 163B Komet and the intimidating Me 262A Schwalbe, the world’s first operational turbojet aircraft. Fewer than 300 saw combat. Pieces of the “Lady Be Good,” a Consolidated B-24D Liberator bomber that went down in the Libyan desert, are on display.

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The Real Cost of Campus Hysteria

Ohio jury awards local business over $33 million after false targeting by outraged college students.

In the 1994 satirical comedy PCU, mobs of angry students run down and protest anyone who offends their cause célèbre at the fictional Port Chester University. Way ahead of its time, the film starring Jeremy Piven and David Spade lampooned the burgeoning movement of “political correctness” on college campuses. Today, we might call these PC warriors “Social Justice Warriors”, or SJWs.

While it’s funny to watch angry mobs of college students chase a hapless pre-frosh through campus in a movie, it’s not so hilarious for the real victims of campus activism. Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio recently learned this lesson the hard way after a jury awarded $44 million to  Gibson’s Food Market and Bakery after students and faculty wrongly targeted them for a protest campaign.

In 2016, the store owner’s son, Allyn Gibson, confronted a student he believed was trying to purchase one bottle of wine with a fake ID and steal two bottles stuffed under his shirt. The student ran from the store and Gibson chased after him. Outside, the report alleged, several more students joined the confrontation and physically assaulted Gibson before fleeing the scene. Three students eventually plead guilty to misdemeanors of aggravated trespassing and attempted theft.

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Ohio State Reformatory in Mansfield, Ohio

Built between 1896 and 1910, the Ohio State Reformatory in Mansfield served as a detention center for young, petty criminals. The first inmates were admitted in 1896, and they helped construct the Romanesque Revival building. The reformatory closed in 1990 and was used most famously in the filming of The Shawshank Redemption (1994). Today it is open for tours, and has attracted a reputation for being haunted.

Photo by Michael Kleen

The old superintendent’s office, where disembodied voices are heard, is widely believed to be haunted by the ghosts of Helen and Warden Glattke. In the basement, the ghost of a 14-year-old boy who was allegedly beaten to death has been reported. Visitors often experience strong feelings of dread, anger, and fear throughout the former reformatory. One form of punishment was to send prisoners to solitary confinement in “the hole”—a dark and claustrophobic room—for an indeterminate amount of time.

A Lonely Hovel
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A tribute to Harmony Korine’s Gummo

My tribute to Harmony Korine’s Gummo (1997), filmed in Syracuse, New York. Gummo is an art film written and directed by Harmony Korine, starring Jacob Reynolds, Nick Sutton, Jacob Sewell, and Chloë Sevigny. It’s set in Xenia, Ohio, a small, poor Midwestern town devastated by a tornado.

My version of ”Bunny Boy” was played by Daisy Rose. The original bunny ears hat was custom made by Chloë Sevigny, so I had to use ears from Bob’s Burgers. “I Love my Little Rooster” sung by Almeda Riddle, recorded by John Quincy Wolf, Jr. on May 10, 1962, courtesy of The John Quincy Wolf Folklore Collection, Lyon College, Batesville, Arkansas.

Akron Civic Theatre’s Ghostly Trio

Originally known as the Loews Theatre, the Akron Civic Theatre was designed by Viennese architect John Eberson in grand “Atmospheric” style. The ceiling was painted to look like the night sky, and it is one of the few theater ceilings that can rotate. The Civic is believed to be haunted by three ghosts. A girl who allegedly committed suicide by jumping into the canal behind the theater has been encountered walking along the edge of the canal, weeping uncontrollably. The ghost of a longtime employee of the theater, a janitor named Fred, has been spotted all over the building. Finally, the anonymous ghost of a man has been seen sitting in the balcony. These phantoms make the Civic Theatre one of the most spirited in Ohio.

The Akron Civic Theatre is located at 182 South Main Street in downtown Akron, Ohio. L. Oscar Beck began construction on this site in 1919, intending to build an impressive entertainment complex called The Hippodrome. His project went bankrupt in 1921 and the site stood incomplete until Marcus Loew, founder of the Loew’s theater chain, built the Loews Theatre there in 1929. It was an ambitious project incorporating Moorish and Mediterranean architecture and decor. The theater lobby extended over the Ohio and Erie Canal. It had many owners over the years, including the Akron Jaycees and the Women’s Guild. In June 2001, the Akron Civic Theatre closed to undergo a $19 million renovation. Today, it is one of only sixteen remaining atmospheric theaters designed by architect John Eberson in the United States.

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