Dan’s Diner in Chatham, New York

Dan’s Diner, at 1005 NY-203 in Chatham, New York, is a 1925 O’Mahony. Owner Dan Rundell purchased this dilapidated diner in 1993 in Durham, Connecticut (where it was called Moe’s Diner or the Durham Diner) and spent 12 years restoring it to its former glory. A photo album in the diner tells the story, but I’m sure its proprietor would be happy to share. The ornate lattice in the windows is very classy.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Advertisements

Milanese Italian Restaurant

Milanese Italian Restaurant
Lovely vintage neon sign for Milanese Italian Restaurant, 115 Main Street in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, just a few blocks from the Hudson River. Santino and Rita Milanese immigrated to the United States in 1956, and they opened their family restaurant in downtown Poughkeepsie in 1971. Their first customer was a lone truck driver who stopped to ask for directions. Today, Alessandro and Aldo Milanese, their sons, run the business and carry on the family tradition.

Martindale Chief Diner in Craryville, New York

Martindale Chief Diner, at 1000 NY-23 in Craryville, New York, is a 1958 Silk City (#5087), formerly owned by Bert Coons, who operated several diners in that area (three of which had the “chief” theme). It’s unfortunate someone removed the neon lights from this slightly politically incorrect sign.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

Fosters Coach House Tavern

Fosters Coach House Tavern
Neon sign for Fosters Coach House Tavern, at 6411 Montgomery Street (U.S. Route 9) in Rhinebeck, New York, along the Hudson River. The tavern opened in 1890 and its first owner was named Walter Decker. Wally Foster called it Foster’s Coach House in the 1940s. In 2016, the Bender family purchased it from Bob and Karen Kirwood, restored it to its original furnishings, menu, and decor, and have been running it ever since. It is a staple of downtown Rhinebeck.

Forts Clinton and Montgomery Battlefield

The Hudson Highlands were once the scene of a heroic last stand at two forts in the shadow of Bear Mountain, New York, unbeknownst to thousands of families visiting the Trailside Zoo each year.

Click to expand photos

The Battle of Forts Clinton and Montgomery (aka Battle of the Hudson Highlands) was fought on October 6, 1777 between British forces commanded by Maj. Gen. Sir Henry Clinton and Maj. Gen. John Vaughan and American forces commanded by Brig. Gen. George Clinton and Brig. Gen. James Clinton at the junction of Popolopen Creek and the Hudson River during the American Revolutionary War. The battle was a hollow victory for the British due to Maj. Gen. John Burgoyne’s surrender at Saratoga later that month.

After the Battle of Freeman’s Farm (or First Saratoga), the British and American armies sat licking their wounds. British Maj. Gen. John Burgoyne’s 5,000 supply-starved men hugged the Hudson River near Saratoga, New York. In late September, Maj. Gen. Sir Henry Clinton moved his 3,100-man army north to relieve Burgoyne and open the Hudson River to British ships. Standing in his way was New York Governor George Clinton with 600 men and 20 artillery pieces at Fort Clinton and Fort Montgomery, plus the warships Montgomery and Congress and three smaller vessels.

British Maj. Gen. Clinton split his army in two in order to assault both forts simultaneously by land. Nine hundred men under Lt. Col. Archibald Campbell were to attack Fort Montgomery and 1,200 men under Clinton and Maj. Gen. John Vaughan would attack Fort Clinton. They would be supported by seven ships on the Hudson.

Continue reading “Forts Clinton and Montgomery Battlefield”

Gnome Chomsky

Gnome Chomsky
Gnome Chomsky,” formerly the world’s largest garden gnome, greets visitors to Kelder’s Farm at 5755 U.S. Route 209 outside the small hamlet of Kerhonkson. Kerhonkson is located in Ulster County, New York along Rondout Creek, which straddles the Catskill Mountains and the Hudson River Valley. John Hutchison and Maria Reidelbach created the statue in 2006.

Left Unspoken

Left Unspoken
Monument to Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Carr in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. During the Civil War, Carr commanded a brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac at the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg.

He was wounded near the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg and went on to command a division in the Union Army of the James. He was promoted to major general in March 1865, just before the end of the war. He also served as Secretary of State of New York for five years.

This 300-acre cemetery was established in 1848 and designed in rural style. It offers a beautiful view of the Hudson Valley and contains the remains of over 16,000 people, including Samuel “Uncle Sam” Wilson.