Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio

Designed by Architect Howard Daniels and established in 1848, Green Lawn Cemetery, at 1000 Greenlawn Avenue in Columbus, Ohio, is a historic private rural cemetery. Its meandering roads wander 360 acres, where over 155,000 are interred, including Samuel Bush, grandfather of President George H.W. Bush and great-grandfather of President George W. Bush, and World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker.

Hayden Mausoleum

The Hayden mausoleum is a centerpiece of Green Lawn Cemetery. It was designed by Ohio architect Frank Packard and built at a modern-day cost of approximately $2.5 million. Built for banker Charles H. Hayden (1837-1920) and his family, it is made from granite and white marble, and its interior sarcophagi were made in Italy. It is truly impressive.

The Fisherman

I love this bronze statue of an old fisherman, erected in the memory of Emil Ambos (1844-1898). Emil was the son of Peter Ambos, a talented German confectioner who became a wealthy banker and industrialist. The statue used to be holding two fish, but apparently both have been stolen.

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Royal Progress at the Maryland Renaissance Festival

The spirit of Tudor England comes alive at the Mid-Atlantic’s most popular Ren fair.

History and magic comes alive outside Annapolis at the Maryland Renaissance Festival, where a huge crowd turned out for Celtic Day last weekend. I was impressed! Jousting and chariot fights were the highlight of the day, but a menagerie of performers kept fair goers entertained throughout the day.

Chariot Race

Welcome to Revel Grove, Oxfordshire, England in the year 1532. King Henry VIII and his mistress Anne Boleyn visit the village as part of their annual summer progress. I didn’t see much of the King and his court, but it’s possible they blended in with the costumed crowd. Visitors were deeply committed to getting into the spirit of the fair.

A Magestic Ride

Rides on a colorfully-painted elephant were one of many amazing experiences for children. The Maryland Renaissance Festival is thoroughly family-friendly, with a huge play area for kids. What a great way to spark children’s imaginations!

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Dan’s Diner in Chatham, New York

Dan’s Diner, at 1005 NY-203 in Chatham, New York, is a 1925 O’Mahony. Owner Dan Rundell purchased this dilapidated diner in 1993 in Durham, Connecticut (where it was called Moe’s Diner or the Durham Diner) and spent 12 years restoring it to its former glory. A photo album in the diner tells the story, but I’m sure its proprietor would be happy to share. The ornate lattice in the windows is very classy.

Look for a new diner every Tuesday in 2019! Click to expand photos.

Diner Resources

EIU Memories: Roc’s Blackfront

It’s fashionable for bars and restaurants to claim some connection to the days of Prohibition, but Roc’s Blackfront Tavern & Grill, at 410 Sixth Street in Charleston, Illinois, is the real deal. It even has the memorabilia to prove it. In my senior and graduate school years at nearby Eastern Illinois University, I frequented Roc’s to have a drink with friends in a classier atmosphere than the usual college bars.

Roc’s ad in the Daily Eastern News, August 18, 2000.

That brick building, absent its black tile facade and martini glass-shaped neon sign, was originally built for the Charleston Courier newspaper office in 1841. Willis W. McClelland opened the Red Front Saloon there in 1917. As fate would have it, the Eighteenth Amendment banning the sale of alcohol in the United States passed in 1919. What were establishments like the Red Front Saloon to do? The saloon changed its name to McClelland’s Cafe and continued to clandestinely sell alcohol a short walk from the county courthouse.

Racing enthusiast Hank O’Day bought the speakeasy in 1931 and renamed it Hank O’Day’s Tavern after Prohibition’s repeal in 1933. Illegal activities continued, however. O’Day ran an underground casino in the room above the bar, complete with buzzer system to alert patrons of police raids. When owner Mike Knoop renovated in 1996, he discovered hidden gambling devices and paraphernalia, including total boards for horse racing and a roulette wheel that now hangs on the wall.

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Pine Cleaners Inc. Warehouse

Pine Cleaners Inc.
Pine Cleaners Inc. at 237 Franklin Street in Watertown, New York. Established in 1989. Not sure if it’s still in operation – building looks abandoned. I experimented with a long exposure time for this night photo, at ISO 80 and a shutter speed of 5 seconds. This allowed my camera to capture rich color and detail with virtually no noise.

For Every Leaf that Falls

For Every Leaf That Falls
Memorial to Maj. Gen. Edwin Vose “Bull” Sumner (1797-1863) in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York.
Sumner was born in Boston and became the oldest Union general in the American Civil War. He commanded the II Corps in the Army of the Potomac and fought at several major battles, including Antietam and Fredericksburg, and earned the nickname “bull” because of a legend that a bullet bounced off his head. He died of illness in Syracuse, NY in 1863.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.