Galleries

Hudson River Valley in Summer

The Hudson River flows 315 miles from the Adirondack Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean at New York Harbor. It’s named after Henry Hudson, a seventeenth century English navigator, and its beauty inspired an entire school of landscape painting. The Hudson Highlands are particularly picturesque in the vicinity of Bear Mountain, Peekskill, and Fort Montgomery, where I took these photos.

Luna at Mount Hope and Warner Castle

Model Luna Mae at Mount Hope Cemetery and Warner Castle in Rochester, New York. I continued to refine my use of a basic 70-300mm lens for this photo shoot.

One technique I’m experimenting with uses exposure compensation and my camera’s highlights feature to help produce a brighter exposure. With exposure compensation, you can increase or decrease the brightness of your photos (essentially by adjusting the shutter speed). With the highlights feature, the camera shows you what parts of your photo are “clipped“, or so bright the camera can’t reproduce the image (essentially pure white).

I start shooting with a high exposure compensation, and gradually decrease it until all the clipping has disappeared. This doesn’t always work because you might have a really bright sky in the background, and sometimes I forget to check the highlights, so I end up with a bunch of over-exposed photos. But generally this technique produces bright, well-exposed images. It’s easier to maintain quality when darkening areas of a photo in editing software than it is when lightening them.

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Bri O on the St. Lawrence River

In this series, model Bri O poses along the St. Lawrence River, mostly with Boldt Castle in the distance. We took some pictures at the wooden gazebo at the Thousand Island Marina on Wellesley Island but only a few came out. This is my favorite spot on the St. Lawrence. I love the history and romanticism of Boldt Castle. Bri’s jacket also contrasted nicely with the snow.

My Favorite Diners in Upstate New York

Last year, I visited diners all over New York, from classic dining cars to more modern establishments. There’s something about the unassuming atmosphere, greasy food, and nostalgia that keeps me coming back. I prefer the classic designs, for obvious reasons. There are plenty of Greek-American restaurants that call themselves diners, but there are only a few originals left. Some of my favorites include Mother’s Cupboard in Syracuse, Center Diner in Peekskill, Lloyd’s Diner in Lowville, and of course Red Robin Diner in Johnson City.

Danny’s Diner in Binghamton, New York

Danny’s Diner, at 151 Main Street in Binghamton, New York, is a classic Sterling model from 1939. According to Roadfood.com, “Danny’s is very popular today, due in large part, we’re sure, to the efforts of owner Pam, whose personality is a perfect complement to Danny’s. Danny and Pam were once married, and when that marriage ended, Danny’s became Pam’s (in ownership, if not in name).”

Red Robin Diner Revisited

I first came across this old diner at the corner of Main and Broad streets in Johnson City, New York last winter. It was closed then, but looks like it’s reopened. The Red Robin Diner, at 268 Main Street, is a classic Mountain View-style diner that originally opened in neighboring Binghamton in 1950 and moved to its present location in 1959. The 35-ton diner took two hours to move. Chris and Pat Anagnostakos ran the business for 37 years until retirement. I love everything about this place, from the vintage 7-Up sign to the neon lights and chrome exterior.